Author: The Activist

Christy Clark–It’s Not Right!

I want to share a story from long ago with you—a story that may well encapsulate the current provincial election campaign. Names are—of course—fictions to protect privacy. A long time ago—a very long time ago, I and partner, Scott, ran a small renovation company (N&S Renovations) in Rossland, BC—not coincidentally the home of one of the finest ski hills in North America. In that remote time Rossland houses in need of repair were so inexpensive–$14,000 for a 1500 sq. ft. home–anyone running any kind of renovation business didn’t dare to put out a shingle for fear of not being able to get past the lineups of homeowners who would come to beg you to show up at their place next. Once Scott and I would begin a reno we would be besieged by neighbours wanting to know when we could start on their homes. And so it was that having completed a pre-ski season month of glass, insulation and addition renovations at the Kennedy’s– a most delightful young family of five–Scott and I moved our tools directly across the street to the Ritter’s home to begin rebuilding just about everything except the kitchen sink—well, actually, we replaced the sink as well! One day at the Ritter’s–a day dedicated to getting lots done because there had been no powder at Red Mountain for at least a week, a day when...

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April 22–beginning of new era in Union Bay?

Despite a deeply and bitterly divided community, on one point there can be no disagreement about the April 6  all candidates forum called to hear from candidates up for election to the Union Bay Improvement District Board: the April 6 forum was a whole lot calmer and (even) safer than the October 19, 2016 forum where the developer’s slate muscled the mike from the moderator and proceeded to belligerently confront the meeting. As I noted in  my Oct 21,2016 post Dog Bones, Development and Water; Healing and Moving on in Union Bay? at one point in the Oct 19 forum, just as one of the developer’s group was being pressured to surrender the commandeered mike and allow the meeting to proceed, I saw what looked like a number of not happy people rising from their seats—enough people that I hastily hoisted my iphone to snap a picture and quickly made my way to the exit doors to ensure they opened easily—in case I needed to make a sudden and hasty retreat! But the April 6 meeting was very different. Some might say that the difference between the October 19 and the April 6 forums was the presence of some pretty beefy looking security guards and the steely resolve of the moderator who laid out the rules of the meeting clearly indicating that the rules were not open to negotiation....

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Garbage and Soul: all things are alive and beautiful

Nature doth thus kindly heal every wound. By the mediation of a thousand little mosses and fungi, the most unsightly objects become radiant of beauty…seen with the eye of the poet , as God sees them, all things are alive and beautiful. -Henry David Thoreau   This past week I attended a fascinating talk titled “Garbage and the Soul – Reclaiming the Rejected.”   The talk, presented to the Comox Valley C.G. Jung Society by that Matt Kelly, a Comox Valley Jungian analyst, kept a full to capacity meeting enthralled for two hours considering some surprising and intriguing aspects of the enigmatic question: “Does what we reject/trash in the outer world (garbage) mirror/come from our treatment of unwanted aspects of our inner life?”—sort of the flip side of the famous Chief Seattle quote: “What befalls the earth befalls all the sons of the earth. This we know: the earth does not belong to man, man belongs to the earth. All things are connected like the blood that unites us all. Man did not weave the web of life; he is merely a strand in it. Whatever he does to the web, he does to himself.” So our treatment of garbage is more like an equilibrium than a one way flow: how we treat the complex world of nature affects the parameters of how we view/treat ourselves; how we treat the...

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BC Elections: The Art of the Story

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’ ‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat. ‘I don’t much care where -‘ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat. ‘- so long as I get SOMEWHERE,’ Alice added as an explanation. ‘Oh, you’re sure to do that,’ said the Cat, ‘if you only walk long enough.” —Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Oh, my gosh, it’s the silly season in BC. Sure as the giving season arrives every year on the wings of the retreating sun, the silly season arrives in BC every four years ushered in on the wings of another BC election. It’s certainly been that way for the fifty years I have been around the Alice in Wonderland world of BC politics. I always protest these exercises in public inanity, but—I must admit– they are in a hookah smoking caterpillar kind of way–entertaining. Remember the 2013 BC Liberal campaign that picked some magical number out of the clouds about Liberally nourished liquefied natural gas creating 100,000 jobs, $1 trillion in economic activity and a $100 billion “Prosperity Fund”? Just like all the other absurd Liberal/Socred campaign promises they dropped the hookah and moved on to the next fantasy as soon as the public mind had been sufficiently smoked...

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Sunnydale

The comprehension of limits is a shattering experience; as shattering as the discovery that the earth is not flat and not the centre of the cosmos. -John N. Cole  Once there was a lovely little town. All the people (about 10,000) loved the fine weather and bright sun that shone down on them year after year, so they named their blessed little village Sunnydale. After people lived there for a long time they began to think that the sun had taken a special liking to their town and saved all its brightest, most vibrantly mellow rays just for their village. Sunnydale was special for other reasons too. It was surrounded with lush green forests, broken only by gentle meadows where long waving grasses mixed with the wildflowers in the most delightful arrangements. The valley bottom was full of rich fertile soil and grew some of the finest crops in the nation. When the people first came to Sunnydale, they looked on the rich soil, the clean water, the bright sunshine, and the tall forests. The land was good, so the people set about building houses, planting gardens, and raising their families. They held dances to celebrate the goodness of the land and the vigor of health that ran through their bodies. Unfortunately, nothing stays the same, and over the years, things began to change. Oil was pumped out of...

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Upcoming Events

Apr
26
Wed
11:30 am Chamber 2017 AGM @ Crown Isle Resort and Golf Community
Chamber 2017 AGM @ Crown Isle Resort and Golf Community
Apr 26 @ 11:30 am – 1:30 pm
Join the Chamber for the Annual General Meeting at Crown Isle Resort with keynote speaker Val Litwin, BC Chamber CEO. Come and welcome our new Board members and thank those who are stepping down from[...]
Apr
27
Thu
7:00 pm 6th Annual Campagnolo Lecture – ... @ Sid Williams Theatre
6th Annual Campagnolo Lecture – ... @ Sid Williams Theatre
Apr 27 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Part of the Sid Williams Theatre Society’s Centre Stage Event series Co-presented with Comox Valley Community Justice Centre Find out more about the event here: http://www.sidwilliamstheatre.com/events/campagnolo-lecture-a-duet-on-justice/ https://www.facebook.com/events/150573102119611/
Apr
28
Fri
10:00 am Comox Valley Fossil Adventures @ Lake Trail Neighbourhood Connections
Comox Valley Fossil Adventures @ Lake Trail Neighbourhood Connections
Apr 28 @ 10:00 am – 2:00 pm
$10.00/parent & child [7-15 years old] *Pre-registration required- email laketrailvision@gmail.com Looking for a great Pro-D Day activity to do with your kids? Why not go fossil hunting? Russ and Lori Ball have been teaching and[...]

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